Mindfulness and Business
Perspectives > Blog Post

Mindfulness and Business

September 15, 2015

Jessie Sims

Mindfulness is not a new concept. Until recently, Mindfulness was a term bound to Buddhist practices and meditation retreats, used as a step towards a great awakening. Although Hinduism was the birthplace of most contemplative practices, mindfulness has been incorporated in people’s lives across the world – mainly through a form of mediation partnered with breathing exercises.

Mindfulness is not a new concept. Until recently, Mindfulness was a term bound to Buddhist practices and meditation retreats, used as a step towards a great awakening. Although Hinduism was the birthplace of most contemplative practices, mindfulness has been incorporated in people’s lives across the world – mainly through a form of mediation partnered with breathing exercises.

Today, mindful meditation has become a commonly used tool that can deeply change the relationship between thoughts and feelings – shifting the perspective one has on their self. Mainly, it’s used as a technique to lower stress and anxiety levels in a world where they run rampant. The practice offers a venue to shed judgment and negative thoughts and welcome open and positive thoughts as a replacement. Due to its powerful outcome on the self, it’s no surprise that therapists and healthcare professionals have increasingly seen the technique as a valuable accessory in their repertoire of exercises.

We have seen an incredible surge of Eastern practices in our Western world. The terms “yoga”, “soul”, “sprit”, “meditation”, “enlightened”, etc. are widely used amongst the general population. Yoga, for one, is a $27 Billon + industry, showing signs of continuing growth. Many people have been exposed to mindfulness practices in one way or another, and now businesses are tuning into the benefits of the ancient practice.

Aetna, Goldman Sachs and General Mills are among many corporations that offer their employees free in-office meditation practice. Research from INSEAD Business School found that doing 15 minutes of mindfulness practice is strongly related to productivity and can lead to an increase in rational thinking when making business decisions. By reducing the static stress of a decision and drawing focus away from the past and future temporarily, it allows for one to think in a clearer manner, making decisions based on unbiased information known in the current moment. This type of un-biased and stress-free thinking has been associated with improved decision-making and greater creativity.

Moral of the story – taking 5-20 minutes out of your work day to practice a form for mindfulness may in turn increase your productivity and quality of work. Take a moment to reboot everyday; it’s a small commitment that seems to have high rewards.

Jessie Sims

Senior Director, Brand Development

Blending an enthusiasm for finding creative solutions to improve business practices with an infectious and collaborative spirit, Jessie has helped companies reinvent their business strategy and new...

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